A Gentleman's Murder

Gentlemans murder wide 2

Prolific Interactive Fiction author Chris Huang has published his debut novel "A Gentleman's Murder" published by Inkshares. This is a classic "golden age" detective story set in London in the 1920s, rich in atmosphere and colorful characters. Huang's writing style will appeal to fans of Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers, Martin Edwards and other classic English mystery writers. Huang brings a modern angle to this genre by dealing with complex issues like race, discrimination and the impact of PSTD on soldiers. 

Interactive fiction fans will recall that Huang was the author of the wonderful "An Act of Murder" as well as three shorter pieces in the Peterkins Investigates series. 

Huang has sold the TV rights to this book and hopefully this will lead to more Peterkins Investigates stories.


Death in Ice Valley

Icevalley

BBC Radio 4 in collaboration with NRK, the national radio of Norway, has launched a new podcast "Death in Ice Valley." It's a modern cold-case investigation of the mysterious 1970 death of a woman in a remote part of Norway known as Isdal, or ice valley. It's one of those strange cases, like the "Somerton Man," that gets more complex the more you dig in. How did she die? Why were the tags clipped from her clothing? Where was she from? Did she have a false identity? 

So far, two episodes have been produced. The production and writing are excellent. Clearly this team has been influenced by the well researched Serial show from NPR. While things start a bit slow, each episode ends with more unanswered questions. The story is told jointly by NRK investigative journalist Marit Higraff and documentary filmmaker Neil McCarthy in a style is reminiscent of the BBC's radio versions the Martin Beck Swedish police procedurals. Because the case is not quite fifty years old, there are interviews with witnesses who met or investigated the Isdal woman who are still alive today.

You can download the series from the BBC or wherever you get your podcasts. If you've listened to the show, let me know what you think of it by posting a comment below.


Mickey Spillane - 100 Years of Attitude

Last stand
March 9 marks Mickey Spillane's 100th anniversary. He was a helluva writer, but he rarely got the respect he deserved. His first published book "I, the Jury" was written in 3 weeks earning him an advance of $1000, the amount needed to buy land and build a house. Even though it's a short novel, clocking in at 160 pages or about 53,000 words, that's s fast pace for any writer.

Spillane's tough guy private detective Mike Hammer became the template for a blood-and-guts noir style that was immortalized on film, television and radio and begat dozens of imitators. Spillane paved the way for many private detective writers and helped legitimize the paperback original genre. 

Nonetheless, Spillane was scorned by the literary world who disliked his pulpy style and heavy-handed plots. But he had the last laugh, writing more than 30 novels that sold more than 200 million copies in his career, making him one of the bestselling authors in the 20th century. As he put it "peanuts outsell caviar." What critics sometimes missed in Spillane and other noir authors' works was the pacing that drew readers in and kept them reading chapter after chapter, book after book.

"Nobody reads a mystery to get to the middle. They read it to get to the end. If it's a letdown, they won't buy anymore. The first page sells that book. The last page sells your next book."
--Mickey Spillane

Ironically, Spillane's death in 2006 hasn't hurt his productivity. Max Allan Collins has gone on to co-write more than a dozen novels Mickey Spillane from unfinished manuscripts that Spillane left in his trust.

To commemorate Spillane's 100th anniversary, two new Spillane / Collins titles are being published for the first time ever: Killing Town, the lost first Mike Hammer novel, and  The Last Stand, the last novel Spillane completed just before his death. (Both are available for pre-order with delivery in April.)

We owe much to Max Allan Collins, Hard Case Crime and Titan Books for their work in publishing these works. 

Like Mickey Spillane? Hate the covers? Let me know in the comments below.


Books for Writers

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I'm a sucker for books on writing. Sometimes, I even read them. Stephen King's book "On Writing" is a classic. I also recommend just about anything by Lawrence Block, whether it's his noir fiction or essays on writing from his years as a columnist for Writer's Digest.

There's no shortage of books on writing, and probably every writer has their favorites. My writer buddy Tal Klein ("The Punch Escrow") recommended two books for me: "Save the Cat" by the late great Blake Snyder and Robert Mckee's "Story." While both focus on screenwriting, these books are also appropriate for genre fiction, games, radio plays etc. They're easy to read and have a mix of practical advice, technique and motivation. They also do a good job analyzing stories such as The Godfather, Chinatown and others. These books are also available on Audible, which is particularly helpful for those with a long commute and not enough time to read.

Snyder and McKee put heavy emphasis on a standard 3 act story structure with key moments along the way. They didn't invent this model, but they are probably the best at demonstrating in practical ways how to apply these ideas to develop a stronger story. 

While some might fear that following a "Hollywood formula" will ruin their creative endeavor, I found it very helpful to understand techniques that keep the story moving along. (Scenes that don't move the story along and don't have dramatic conflict need to be cut!) In my view, having a good structure helps more than it hurts, and learning how to raise the stakes and add dramatic tension is as important in a novel as it is in film.

Your mileage may vary, but after listening to these books on Audible, I was able to strengthen my work-in-progress novel considerably.  Now back to work!


BBC 4 Radio - Game Over

  BBC game over

Prolific game designer and IF author Emily Short has written her first play for radio entitled "Game Over" now available on BBC 4 Radio. I was lucky enough to be traveling in Canada where the show is accessible.

I'm a fan of Emily Short's interactive fiction and I appreciate her efforts to write about the game industry in her analysis of games, her reviews of books and now in dramatic form. "Game Over" is an interesting take on the industry as it describes an indie game developer's attempt to build a game within the traditional game industry that is far beyond the industry's tropes. The effects of climate change on an Alaskan village could be an apt metaphor for the gaming industry itself. The acting is well done and the production is top notch. It's a good story and definitely worth a listen. 

However, as others have noted, "Game Over" is a bit heavy-handed at times. Perhaps in an effort to make the story realistic, the main characters came across as rigid and not very likeable. In this regard, it's reminiscent of HBO's "Silicon Valley" which has gone from comedy to quasi-documentary, and is full of characters you'd never root for, let alone want to work with. Nonetheless, "Game Over" is a thought-provoking story (and meta story) with a clever ending. 

I believe the show is available streamed from the BBC for 30 days in the UK, Canada and US.

If you've given the show a listen, please share your comments below.